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    What is deader than a door nail

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    Almost certainly the euphony has caused the phrase to survive longer than the alternatives I've quoted. The usual reason given is that a doornail was one of the heavy studded nails on the outside of a medieval door, or possibly that the phrase refers to the particularly big one on which the knocker rested. The usual reason given is that a doornail was one of the heavy studded nails on the outside of a medieval door, or possibly that the phrase refers to the particularly big one on which the knocker rested. deader than a doornail down into the wood. A nail that was bent in this fashion (and thus not easily pulled out) was said to be "dead", thus dead as a doornail. English - Etymology - Adjective.

    [Faith without works is feebler than nothing, and dead as a doornail.] The expression was in widespread colloquial use in England by the 16th century, when. Dead as a doornail is a phrase which means not alive, An alternative wording of the phrase dead as a doornail is deader than a doornail. As to why it is then a “doornail” instead of other cases where such clenching was done, it's thought it was probably simply because this was.

    deader-than-a-doornail definition: Adjective (not comparable) 1. (humorous) Alternative form of dead as a doornail. Definition of deader than a doornail in the Idioms Dictionary. deader than a doornail phrase. What does deader than a doornail expression mean? Definitions by. To prevent theft, and probably to prevent the doornail from loosening (a door If you hammer a nail through a piece of timber and then flatten the end over on. but then so are diamonds, doughnuts, and doorknobs. So why were doornails chosen of all things? What is the origin of dead as a doornail?. Doornails are the large-headed studs that were used in earlier times for strength and more recently as decoration. The practice was to hammer.

    A door knob is not alive and never has been--you can't get any more dead. (My mother used to say, "dead as a door nail." I have no idea what a. Translations in context of "deader than a doornail" in English-Arabic from Reverso Context: Now he's dead. Deader than a doornail. But why particularly a doornail, rather than just any old nail? Could it be because of the repetition of sounds, and the much better rhythm of the phrase. It's alive? Dear Word Detective: I just used the expression “deader than a doornail.” Why is a doornail dead? — Dick Stacy. Beats me. Too many.